Like the City of Atlanta overall, neighborhoods in the Westside Future Fund area have seen notable shifts in their demographics. The area saw a population loss of nearly 2,000 residents between the year 2000 and 2015 despite the city experiencing population gains overall.

This recent decline in population is part of a larger trend of population loss that started in the 1960s. One of the Westside Future Fund’s goals is to repopulate the Westside as a mixed-income community. Check out the Westside Future Fund’s impact goals on our website. 

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POPULATION

Data Sources: 2000 U.S. Census and the 2011-2015 American Community Survey.

Standout Stat: The population of these neighborhoods decreased by nearly 2,000 residents between the year 2000 and 2015, with Ashview Heights seeing the greatest loss.

  • Ashview Heights

    27% Decline in population between 2000 and 2015.

  • Atlanta University Center

    5% Decline in population between 2000 and 2015.

  • English Avenue

    11.5% Decline in population between 2000 and 2015.

  • Vine City

    3.5% Increase in population between 2000 and 2015.

  • Westside Future Fund Area

    9% Decline in population between 2000 and 2015.

Age

Data Sources: 2011-2015 American Community Survey.

Standout Stat: People younger than 35 years old make up 73.3% of WFF's residents by comparison, 52.7% of the City of Atlanta’s total population is younger than 35.

Race

Data Sources: 2000 U.S. Census and the 2011-2015 American Community Survey.


Standout Stat: While both the City of Atlanta and Westside Future Fund neighborhoods experienced a decrease in their Black population between 2000 and 2015, the figures for Westside Future Fund neighborhood are far steeper, with a decrease of nearly 19 percent. The City of Atlanta, by comparison, had a 9 percent decrease in its Black population.